Storm warning

The latest novel in my Florida crime series may read as fiction but it’s based on a very real threat—super storms and the surge they create. As residents of Virginia and the Carolinas will attest, it’s a problem that affects inland regions as well as the coast.

In Permanent Vacation, detective turned real estate agent CW (Candace) McCoy tackles the financial and mortal consequences of encouraging development in those flood-prone areas–action that will jeopardize her partners, her livelihood and her life.

In her fourth outing (after Peak Season, Tourist in Paradise and Curb Appeal), CW relishes a fresh start—a new agency, a stellar property and a second chance at love. But opportunity turns tragic as she confronts the city elite and their web of deception and greed.

While the series is set on the Gulf Coast, the novels are informed by my experience as a journalist and marketing executive in several tourism hotspots, from the Sunshine State to Philadelphia, the greater Lehigh Valley and my hometown in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. What’s more, I’ve lived through several powerful storms that battered both states, including Hurricanes Sandy and Irma.

Then came Florence and Michael. That’s enough to send anyone on a permanent vacation.

Published by Allusion Books, the novel is available from Amazon, Apple Books, Barnes & Noble, Kobo and Smashwords, and by request from bookstores everywhere.

‘Permanent Vacation’ on sale now

Permanent Vacation, the fourth in the CW (Candace) McCoy series of crime novels, goes on sale today, a week earlier than expected. Welcome news, given the short time left before the holidays.

Published by Allusion Books, the work is available from Amazon, Apple Books, Barnes & Noble, Kobo and Smashwords, as well as by request at bookstores everywhere.

Readers new to the series can view all of the books on the Amazon author page.

And for those who enjoy original artwork, here’s a first look at the full cover.

Global warning

Water, water everywhere and so many places to build.

Permanent Vacation, the fourth in the CW McCoy series of crime novels, may be fiction but it deals with the very real issues of super storms and coastal flooding–an issue even inland locations faced during this hurricane season.

The launch date is Dec. 12 but you can preorder the ebook from Amazon, Apple Books, Barnes & Noble, Kobo and Smashwords.

The return of CW McCoy

Florida’s detective turned real estate agent returns to determine if you really can fight city hall.

In the tony beach-side town of Spanish Point, CW (Candace) McCoy tackles a crime waves that’s rising faster than the tide. But that’s not her biggest dilemma, as trouble comes in threes. Will she keep her job? Can she choose between Tony and Mitch? And will she ever see Walter again?

Permanent Vacation, the fourth in the crime series, launches Dec 12, but you can preorder the ebook from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple Books, Kobo and Smashwords.

The Candidate

In honor of the current election cycle, an excerpt from my suspense/thriller, Mr. Magic. You can read the full-tilt lunacy of the role public relations plays in this and other marketing campaigns at Amazon, iTunes, Barnes & Noble, Kobo and bookstores almost everywhere.

And now, Brinker, the defrocked journalist turned PR whiz, will show you how campaigns work their magic:

On a blustery day in early April, Mary Margaret Paulson stood in an open hanger with the snow swirling like dust devils and gazed at the adoring masses. She looked every bit the presidential candidate. Perfect cheekbones, glossy red lips and a bushel of rich brown hair. Long legs in a black pencil skirt, lacy blouse and a red power jacket with shoulders big enough to carry half the states to the convention.

On the campaign trail she’d been called Chillbilly and Bible Spice for her passionate defense of religious freedom. The media mocked her. The pundits hated her. But Brinker knew one thing that many had forgotten: the woman oozed sex from every pore, and men and women alike would sacrifice their firstborn to share the air with her.

The scene resembled a campaign rally. An American flag hung behind two corporate jets emblazoned with the cement company’s logo. Paulson stood on a wooden A-Treat box behind a lectern decorated with patriotic bunting and waved like the queen on parade. A crowd of at least a thousand swelled around her, a line of police officers in reflective vests keeping protesters and supporters on opposite sides of the concrete apron. Sitting in rows of folding chairs under space heaters were local and state dignitaries, representatives from the governor’s office, county council members and the mayors of every city within a fifty-mile radius. The rest of the rabble stood in the cold, their hats declaring allegiance to Garth Brooks, the Phillies and the NRA.

Brinker focused on Paulson’s speech. In an effort to cut costs, the cement company wanted to burn hazardous waste. Residents weren’t convinced by the company’s health studies, which showed emissions would remain below EPA thresholds. His position paper had dealt with the need to balance environmental protection with economic growth. He’d reduced it to three bullet points. Paulson hadn’t gotten through the first when she veered off-message like a bike that had lost its training wheels. She ranted about liberals and intellectuals, the elite and the effete, people who were ruining the country with their bleeding hearts and costly regulations, stifling growth and free enterprise and everything that made America great.

The crowd cheered and Brinker, the PR whiz who’d turned a serial killer into a national brand, started to worry that the stunt wouldn’t backfire, that it wouldn’t create the chaos that guaranteed national coverage. Then, from across the tarmac, he heard the sound of grinding gears and smelled the belch of diesel exhaust as an ancient blue school bus tottered around the corner of the hanger and four dozen Korean woman dressed in hot pink jumpsuits piled out, Buddha at the fore, the notes of Psy’s “Gangnam Style” throbbing from a speaker on the roof.

Buddha, AKA Benjamin Kwon, community organizer and ace travel agent who helped the pursued disappear from the grid. Handing signs to the women—he’d economized by printing both sides, “Feel the Burn” on the front and, on the back, “Burn, Baby, Burn”—he marched them through the crowd, the Koreans forming a wall between supporters and protesters. As they twirled their signs and waved to the camera, Buddha broke away and headed for the perimeter.

Brinker sidled up to him. “How’s it going?”

“’Oppa oppa Gangnam style.’”

“You should run for office.”

Realizing that reinforcements had arrived, Paulson pointed at the ground with a sharply manicured finger and shouted, “This is it! Right here in little old Allentown, PA! The front lines of the battle, the home of concrete and steel that made this nation great!”

The crowd surged, one half cheering, the other half waving signs mounted on wooden stakes the size of baseball bats. Brinker could smell the blood lust as it raced through them, flaring nostrils, pumping muscles, raking their skin until they began to howl.

The handlers must have felt the massive animal coiling for a strike because two of them flanked the lectern as Paulson finished her speech with the pump of a fist and the cry of “Burn, baby, burn!”

The audience exploded, the police line collapsed. Protesters wielded their signs like clubs. Politicians ducked behind the flag. The cement company’s security force, standing respectfully at attention during the remarks, formed a firewall while the handlers hustled Paulson through the back of the hanger.

As police rushed in with batons, Buddha pulled Brinker to the sidelines. Above the roar of sirens, he said, “We have failed you, my friend.”

Brinker smiled as video crews captured the melee. “It’s all good.”

You are where you are

Location, location, location. You hear it all the time in real estate. The tagline is just as important in fiction. And appropriate, given that the lead character in the CW McCoy series of crime novels is a woman who sells real estate. As a transplant, I’m especially aware of it.

That leads to a question I’ve asked since I began writing novels: just when does setting become a character? When does location move from background to foreground?

Readers from Pennsylvania to Florida have called out locales they recognize in both the McCoy and the Brinker novels. Even with names altered to simplify and protect, those locations seem to resonate with them.

As we near publication of the fourth McCoy novel, let’s review the importance of place in the series, which started with Peak Season and progressed to Tourist in Paradise and the latest, Curb Appeal. (You’ll have a chance to preview the new title and cover design later this year.)

In the meantime, I hope you enjoy these scenes from Florida’s Gulf Coast, where the sun shines on the good and bad alike.

Jeff Widmer is the author of five novels and three books of nonfiction. You’ll find his Amazon author page here.

Condos line the skyline of Sarasota, Fl, across from the marina where Walter Bishop berths his sailboat in Peak Season

 

A Viking Sport Cruiser yacht like the one CW hijacks in Tourist in Paradise

 

Deep Hole at Myakka Park, where alligators aren’t the only predators in Curb Appeal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading, Florida style

My wonderful friend and fellow writer Jeanne Johansen sent me this photo of two members of her husband’s book club reading Peak Season on Florida’s Treasure Coast.

Peak Season marks the first of a trilogy of crime novels featuring real estate agent turned investigator CW (Candace) McCoy. You can find it and the other novels in the series at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes and Kobo, with the audio version at Audible.

Thank you, readers, everywhere.

Have a photo of you or your friends reading a CW or a Brinker novel? Feel free to send the image to editor (at) allusionbooks (dot) com.

 

The mystery of the critique

Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot often says the secret to his success as a detective is simple: “Order and method.” We writers could use a bit of that ourselves.

Elizabeth George, author of the Inspector Thomas Lynley mysteries, has two criteria for evaluating fiction: strengths and inconsistencies. In other words, what did the writer do right, and are there any inconsistencies in character, plot, setting, tone, or language.

At the risk of second-guessing the author of 28 books, many of which have made it to TV, I’d like to add one more metric to the list: clarity.

Why is clarity important? Because what’s in the author’s head doesn’t always make it onto the page. Finding the holes in our story is like using a single mirror to see the back of our heads. We need a second opinion.

What about George’s criteria? I believe they are essential to good critiquing. Simple, but not widely practiced.

Consistency means the characters behave in a manner that is congruent with the personalities we’ve created for them. The language and tone should do the same.

The idea of strengths is simple but its application is often misunderstood. If we focus on the good parts of a manuscript, the writer will, too; hopefully the better work will crowd out some of the lesser stuff. That runs counter to some people’s philosophy—I’ve been stopped after class by those who want to know why I encourage a tiny piece of good writing in a sea of struggle—but that’s the exception to the rule.

What should writers avoid when critiquing a manuscript? In her work of nonfiction, Write Away, George urges us to forget about our own tastes. After reading or hearing a piece, many writers will say they liked or disliked the writing, characters, language, or plot. A typical response from even the most educated is, “I couldn’t get into it.”

That kind of critique doesn’t give the writer enough detail to improve, and might discourage an emerging talent. As George points out, it’s not our story. We’re not there to rewrite the work but to call out the strengths and flag the confusion. Did the writer mean to change point of view in mid-chapter? Is she experimenting with time by switching tense in mid-sentence? Those inconsistencies are concrete, measurable, and susceptible to improvement.

All of this boils down to a single question: are we critiquing the construction of the work or the content? If we develop a system that relies on order and method, we’ll know. And so will the reader.

 

‘Thrilling and suspenseful’

What a way to start the new year. Amy Shannon of Amy’s Bookshelf has written an expressive review of Curb Appeal that awards the novel four stars. She calls CW McCoy’s third outing in the Southwest Florida series “thrilling and suspenseful.”

Since the review is brief, and Amy has graciously granted permission to reprint it, I’m doing so here.

“This is a great story that has more than just one plot, but the major plot points to a murder and CW is a detective who must solve it. The writing brings the reader right smack in the middle of the story. It’s an interesting and intriguing story, and makes the reader want to see more sides of CW McCoy. I haven’t read other books from Widmer, but I definitely will add more to my TBR list. I look forward to going back to reading the first two McCoy books.”

So do customers who have left comments on Amazon. “A spell binding addition to the CW McCoy series. Can’t wait for the next one.” “I like how the characters have developed over the three books, the drama and the levity in parts. It is a good read!” “I read it in two sittings and got nothing done around the house! I loved it and highly recommend it.”

Reader reaction to Peak Season, the first of the McCoy novels, was just as enthusiastic. Kirkus Reviews called it “an entertaining mystery romp” and things just got better from there. “Really a good read with lots of character details and plot twists.” “Widmer’s created a great protagonist with many facets…hope to hear more of her!” “The details of south Florida lifestyle and tourist season are spot on.” “Made me want to hear more of CW’s adventures!”

Many came to the novel through the audiobook version and wanted to hear more. “Very skillfully written; the characters are described in such detail that they feel real and relatable.” “The scenes are intricate, suspenseful, and haunting. This book has everything: mystery, romance, suspense, and murder! Overall, Peak Season was a very engaging read and I cannot wait to start the next novel.” “All in all, a great start to what promises to be an interesting, fun series, and I look forward to finding out what Jeff Widmer has in store for CW in the future.”

Those who like a strong female protagonist in mystery/suspense fiction might appreciate these reactions: “Amazing that a male writer can do such a great job with a female character as the lead!” and “A good read for guys, too, even though the main voice is a woman.”

You can find all of the books in the CW McCoy series in print or electronic form at Amazon, Amazon UK, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Kobo and through bookstores everywhere. Peak Season is available in audio format through Audible, as is my other mystery/suspense series, starting with Mr. Mayhem, the book that introduces the defrocked journalist named Brinker who, as a purveyor of public relations, brings new meaning to the term fake news.